Monday, 27 July 2015

Holiday Reading


Roger Mosey is a chap you'd certainly want to meet. He witnessed what the Queen might have called the BBC's 'annus horribilis'. Savile, Newsnight et al. His perspective of that hugely challenging spell is thoroughly illuminating; and offers insight into how it must have felt deep inside the Corporation on those dark days.  His book, 'Getting Out Alive', kicks off with those witness accounts of the BBC storm, and then pedals through his career: from his spell at the birth of Pennine Radio in Bradford; past the Today programme; being Valerie Singleton's boss; off to control 5 Live; and beyond.  It's a brilliantly-crafted book, and a rewarding read.  Like many tomes by ex-BBC staff, there is a tolerance of the Corporation's headaches and silliness, combined with a huge amount of love and respect.


It's tough to conjure up a single epithet for John Myers. Is he a consultant? A presenter? A programmer? A businessman? His biography calls him a 'radio executive', so I shall stick with that label, although it does not really do justice to this canny and much-loved larger than life figure.  He's known by everybody anyway, so it matters little. His "Team, it's Only Radio" book is an easy and entertaining read, with John's rich stories of the characters and key events in commercial radio's first age told with the gift of a great Northern story-teller. I gather he may be considering a sequel. I'll buy that too.


In 1988, a woman turned up at Broadcasting House with a gun, frustrated at not being able to receive Radio 4.  Any book which kicks off with that anecdote is certainly worth a read. 'Life on-air: A history of Radio 4' by David Hendy is a meticulously-researched account of a network with a special place in the nation's heart.  It's maybe a little detailed for the sun-lounger, but a fascinating account of how the network found its feet and claimed its current territory. A lighter, but nevertheless painstakingly assembled, account of the station is offered in 'For the Love of Radio 4', written with deep affection by Caroline Hodgson. Lots of fascinating facts, a smile or two about the close relationship the station enjoys with its audience; and it utters the unsayable: that most Shipping Forecast listeners are actually on land.



You can't help but like Scott Mills. He emerges from his 'Love you, Bye: My Story' biography as a thoroughly lovely, honest guy. His biog is another light read, in the nicest possible way, sharing the trials, tribulations and many successes of his life with utter openness and great humour.  From his cripplingly shy youth and frighteningly typical hospital radio station, through the anxious early days at Ocean Sound, ending up at one of the best places in British radio.  Tales of Scott the radio presenter are interlaced with stories of Scott the man, to huge effect.  Also, witness the tale behind his impressive and still-remembered 'World's worst place to be gay?' TV show.



I'll concede that it's unlikely even the most diligent radio person will wish to thumb through a law book on holiday over the Margaritas, but in a list of radio books, it's a self-evident must. Without one, you may not not have a job to pay for next year's holiday.  Essential Radio Journalism is a book designed to be read and used by people like us; although, as the name suggests, it really is not just about law. Paul Chantler and Peter Stewart show how to do the radio journalist job well; and offer a pithy reminder not to refer to 'huge security operations' or 'trained negotiators' in news stories, given small security operations and untrained negotiators are few and far between. There's even a section on how to sit when you're doing your bulletins. 



When it comes to great radio consultants around the World, a few names stick out. Phil Dowse is one; and another is Valerie Geller.  I still remember fondly my time working with her on LBC, when we ensnared presenters into a luxury West London hotel room for a little counselling. Fascinating times. When you've met Valerie, or heard her speak, you can hear her insistent voice as you plough through her publications.  She's a great performer. Her books are very much a practical offering.  'Never be boring', she rightly says.  This latest publication takes us 'Beyond Powerful Radio', helping us to exploit radio in a changing media world.




Jeremy Vine strikes me as someone who has fairly recently really discovered the depth of his love for this great thing called radio.  From being perhaps best known from TV, he has quietly now become a Radio 2 stalwart, delivering an enviably accessible, entertaining talk show with confidence and immense skill. His casting for that show was inspired; and he's mastered social media too. The quality of writing in 'It's all News to Me', however, shows his journalistic grounding and tells of a humble, likeable guy, "locked inside the BBC for 25 years". Beautifully-written, entertaining stories of a fascinating life; the life of the youngest ever presenter on the Today programme.




One great thing about Kenny Everett is that much audio still exists. Much has been written too; but little with the care and love as this book from James Hogg and Robert Sellers: The Authorised Biography of Kenny Everett'. Affectionate, but utterly well-informed by those who got as close to Kenny's complex character as anyone could.










And there's my own humble publication. Forgive me. I'm never sure whether the title 'How to Make Great Radio' really helps describe it. Yes, there are many suggestions on radio technique, but also some stories too from my decades in this industry, given no-one will likely ever wish to buy my autobiography. I have to say I've been touched by the feedback from people I respect highly; and from those newer in the industry who suggest they've derived huge value from it. I'm particularly pleased that many who've been in the business some years have also suggested it has offered even them some food for thought. Grab it on Amazon, or direct from my fine publishers, Biteback, at a bargain price. Proceeds to the Radio Academy.

4 comments:

  1. David, I'd add Johnnie Walkers biog and Johnny Beerling's tails of Radio 1. Your book is fantastic. I am a radio amateur and electronics engineer, but I learnt a thing or two about microphones after reading :-)

    Steve Taylor

    ReplyDelete
  2. I'd agree with both of those - and have read both. Good spot.

    ReplyDelete
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